by Tim Lezard National Express has banned a union’s advertisements from its coaches in Birmingham during the Conservative Party Conference. The NASUWT booked 15 adverts on coaches in the city but at the last minute was told they were “too political”. T …

Tim Lezard Europe, UK, Education (EI), Teachers,

National Expressby Tim Lezard

National Express has banned a union’s advertisements from its coaches in Birmingham during the Conservative Party Conference.

The NASUWT booked 15 adverts on coaches in the city but at the last minute was told they were “too political”.

The union today launches its campaign aimed at parents and the public, highlighting the impact of the Conservative-driven Government education policy on children and young people.

In the run up to next year’s General Election, the union is seeking to ensure that the public is aware fully of the impact of the Coalition government’s policies on the entitlements of children and young people.

The union has commissioned a number of ad vans and ad walkers who will tour Birmingham, including Broad Street and the environs of the ICC where the Conservative Party Conference is being held.

As well as carrying a distinctive advertising board, the ad walkers will hand out leaflets to the public.

NASUWT general secretary Chris Keates said: “It is critically important to raise public awareness of the adverse impact of key aspects of current education policy on children and young people.

“Fundamental rights and entitlements, which would ensure that all children and young people have equality of access to high quality education have been swept aside.

“Education is a key public service, vital to the country’s future. The public needs to understand how the relentless ideological assault of the last four years has led to fragmentation, segregation and inequality.”


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Tim Lezard

Campaigning journalist, editor of @Union_NewsUK, NUJ exec member; lover of cricket, football, cycling, theatre and dodgy punk bands

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