In February, we wrote about wage theft from the workers of Metropolis music stores in Greece. They had been laid off by owner Andreas Kouris. He failed to pay them the € 600,000 in wages he owed them, claiming he didn’t have the money. And yet he found …

Walton Pantland

Metropolis music

In February, we wrote about wage theft from the workers of Metropolis music stores in Greece. They had been laid off by owner Andreas Kouris. He failed to pay them the € 600,000 in wages he owed them, claiming he didn’t have the money. And yet he found enough to sponsor the extravagantly expensive Greek Eurovision Song Contest.

This lead to the dramatic image of riot police protecting the Eurovision contest from workers protesting against their stolen wages: in the New Europe, the spectacle must go on at all costs.

However, Metropolis workers are getting justice through the courts. The Athens Court declared that is was “contrary to morality” for Kouris to enjoy profit and advertising revenue with pauperising workers.

This opens the way for Metropolis workers to claim back the wages owned to them.


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Walton Pantland

South African trade unionist living in Glasgow. Loves whisky, wine, running and the great outdoors. Walton did an MA in Industrial Relations at Ruskin, Oxford, and is interested in how trade unions use new technology to organise.

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