Three leaders of the historic strike at Dunnes Stores in Dublin, Ireland, in the 1980s, attended Mandela’s memorial yesterday. They were members of the Irish Distributive and Administrative Union who implemented a union instruction in July 1984 not to …

Walton Pantland

An-boks-amach-the-Irish-Anti-Apartheid-Movement-1

Three leaders of the historic strike at Dunnes Stores in Dublin, Ireland, in the 1980s, attended Mandela’s memorial yesterday. They were members of the Irish Distributive and Administrative Union who implemented a union instruction in July 1984 not to handle South African goods, in protest at the apartheid regime. Mary Manning, a check-out operator, was the first to refuse to handle goods and was suspended from her position.

A picket was put on the store and 10 of Mary Manning’s colleagues went on strike with her. The strike lasted two years and nine months and led to Ireland being the first country in the world to ban goods from South Africa in 1987.

Watch the video of former Dunnes Stores strikers en route to Mandela’s memorial at Dublin airport.


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Walton Pantland

South African trade unionist living in Glasgow. Loves whisky, wine, running and the great outdoors. Walton did an MA in Industrial Relations at Ruskin, Oxford, and is interested in how trade unions use new technology to organise.

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