The euro area (EA17) unemployment rate was 10.7% in January 2012, compared with 10.6% in December 2011. It was 10.0% in January 2011. The EU27 unemployment rate was 10.1% in January 2012, compared with 10.0% in December 2011. Eurostat estimates that 24 …

Walton Pantland

The euro area (EA17) unemployment rate was 10.7% in January 2012, compared with 10.6% in December 2011. It was 10.0% in January 2011. The EU27 unemployment rate was 10.1% in January 2012, compared with 10.0% in December 2011.

Eurostat estimates that 24.3 million men and women in the EU27, nearly 17 million were in the euro area, were unemployed in January 2012. Compared with December 2011, the number of persons unemployed increased by 191 000 in the EU27 and by 185 000 in the euro area.

UK unemployment rose by 48,000 to 2.67 million in the three months to December. The unemployment rate was 8.4%, according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the highest for 16 years. The unemployment total for 16-24 year olds rose 22,000 to 1.04m million in the quarter, taking the unemployment rate in the 16-24 age group to 22.2%.

Among the European Member States, the lowest unemployment rates were recorded in Austria (4.0%), the Netherlands (5.0%) and Luxembourg (5.1%), and the highest in Spain (23.3%), Greece (19.9% in November 2011), Ireland and Portugal (both 14.8%).

The highest increases in unemployment were registered in Greece (14.1% to 19.9% between November 2010 and November 2011), Cyprus (6.3% to 9.6%) and Spain (20.6% to 23.3%). Between January 2011 and January 2012, the unemployment rate for males increased from 9.7% to 10.5% in the euro area and from 9.4% to 10.1% in the EU27. The female unemployment rate rose from 10.3% to 10.9% in the euro area and from 9.6% to 10.1% in the EU27.

In January 2012, 5.5 million young people (under 25) were unemployed in the EU27; 3.3 million were in the euro area. In January 2012, the youth unemployment rate was 22.4% in the EU27 and 21.6% in the euro area. In January 2011 it was 21.1% and 20.6% respectively. The highest rates were in Spain (49.9%), Greece (48.1% in November 2011) and Slovakia (36.0%).

Source: Eurostat


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Walton Pantland

South African trade unionist living in Glasgow. Loves whisky, wine, running and the great outdoors. Walton did an MA in Industrial Relations at Ruskin, Oxford, and is interested in how trade unions use new technology to organise.

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