A celebration of social commitment through cinema, the festival brings eighteen phenomenal films touching on the issues of labour to the heart of London in September 2012. Across three days, the festival will offer a fascinating and varied take on issu …

Walton Pantland

A celebration of social commitment through cinema, the festival brings eighteen phenomenal films touching on the issues of labour to the heart of London in September 2012. Across three days, the festival will offer a fascinating and varied take on issues of work, labour struggle and the emotional and societal importance of labour issues, welcoming special guests and inviting discussion.

Born of a commitment to labour cinema, and spurred on by what is a growing movement linking labour issues to the cultural arena, this year’s festival is a launch pad for what is envisaged as a long term project.

Offering stimulating films from around the globe, the festival is intended to provide inspiration and discussion to those with a standing interest in labour, as well as broadening the minds of those new to the issues that these films explore.

We can think of no better venue for such a series than the Prince Charles Cinema, one of London’s truly independent cinemas, which we are delighted to be using as the festival’s hub.

With special guests including Ken Loach, who will be attending the festival to introduce his classic film Navigators and Mike Leigh, who will attend to answer audience questions on his classic work High Hopes, we will be welcoming two of Britain’s most acclaimed directors. Showing the artistic relevance of the issues that the festival will be exploring, the festival will also feature contributions from award-winning journalist Owen Jones, a live performance from acclaimed musicians at our screening of classic Woody Guthrie biopic Bound For Glory, and a very special panel discussion around Ross Ashcroft’s Four Horsemen, a prescient take from 23 international thinkers on how to make the world a more fairer place for all.

The festival is also delighted to be hosting a competition of labour short films, which will be judged by a global panel and will act as a celebration of the continued relevance of labour issues to young filmmakers.

With a programme that travels from shocking accounts of global working conditions (Michael Glawogger’s Workingman’s Death) to fantastical forays into the plight and ingenuity of future work forces (Moon, Metropolis) and from portraits of fractured working class communities (Snows of Kilimanjaro) to 80s cheese with They Live, the London Labour Film Festival offers a challenging and fun cinematic exploration of important and relevant issues.

Special thanks go to the partners and supporters that have made London Labour Film Festival

2012 possible, including the TUC, UNITE, the Federation of Entertainment Unions, Thompsons solicitors and UNISON, and to all of the staff and others who have worked so hard to bring this very special event to UK audiences this Autumn. We look forward to welcoming you all for what will be a very special cinematic celebration of workers on film.

Visit the website and download the full programme.

 


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Walton Pantland

South African trade unionist living in Glasgow. Loves whisky, wine, running and the great outdoors. Walton did an MA in Industrial Relations at Ruskin, Oxford, and is interested in how trade unions use new technology to organise.

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