The Guardian reports – not entirely accurately – on radical labour law reforms that have been passed in Mexico. The law has been passed by the National Action Party (PAN) government of Mexico. PAN is a right wing, Christian Democratic party, and …

Walton Pantland

 

The Guardian reports – not entirely accurately – on radical labour law reforms that have been passed in Mexico. The law has been passed by the National Action Party (PAN) government of Mexico. PAN is a right wing, Christian Democratic party, and ostensible the purpose of the ending a sometimes corrupt relationship between Mexico’s unions and the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), which has held power for much of Mexico’s history. It aims to improve transparency by introducing a secret ballot to union elections, and other measures.

However, it real purpose can be seen by some of its provisions:

  • It makes it much easier to outsource, and use agency labour
  • It introduces individual contracts
  • It allows employers to employ by the hour for the first time, instead of by the day – which will lead to the rise of short shifts during busy periods

The PAN says it will created 400,000 jobs, but what will it mean for Mexican workers? This interview, conducted for us by Stephen of Cyberunions, gives some background and analysis:

 

[powerpress url=http://archive.org/download/MexicanLabourLawReform/MexicanLabourLawReform.mp3]

 

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For more information, also see IndustriALL Global Union.


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Walton Pantland

South African trade unionist living in Glasgow. Loves whisky, wine, running and the great outdoors. Walton did an MA in Industrial Relations at Ruskin, Oxford, and is interested in how trade unions use new technology to organise.

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