There’s no doubt the biggest story is the #eurozone crisis. The future of the European countries involved in the single currency is going to be determined to a large extent by the elections this weekend in #Greece2012. The polls show a neck and neck fi …

Andrew

There’s no doubt the biggest story is the #eurozone crisis. The future of the European countries involved in the single currency is going to be determined to a large extent by the elections this weekend in #Greece2012. The polls show a neck and neck fight between New Democracy and Syriza.

Here’s our selection of some of the most interesting takes on one of the most important elections in any country since the end of the World War II. First up is a video by the Financial Times ‘Greece on the Brink’ and from Paul Mason at the BBC who talks to a Greek shop keeper on his desire for change. Two articles via Al Jazeera from Greeks are also an interesting read. In a must watch video via The Guardian the impact of austerity in the biggest hospital in Greece is clear for all to see.

Despina Lalaki in a piece titled ‘The Greek crisis as racketeering’ discusses the financial bailout packages imposed by the “troika”, the European Commission, the European Central Bank, and International Monetary Fund and the . The ‘unprecedented austerity measures which brought the lower and middle classes to their knees, while leaving intact the privileges of the financial elites and their political aides’.

Matthaios Tsimitakis in a brilliant article ‘Against all odds: Democracy vs technocrats in Greece’ discusses how a leftist victory might inspire the young, highly educated, but unemployed demonstrating in the squares of Rome, Lisbon, Dublin and Madrid. #USi was delighted to meet him when we visited Athens on @radiobubble and you can listen to our interview here around 7 minutes into the show.

In an article written by Jon Henley steelworkers enter over 230 days of strike. The workers of Elliniki Halyvourgia – the name means Greek Steelworks – in Aspropyrgos, 40 minutes’ drive from central Athens. The factory’s 380 workers would be expected to take a 40% pay cut.


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