by Samantha Ritchie  Objectifying women is now prime time entertainment in Denmark. A new TV show objectifies women by allowing two men to critique their bodies while the woman remains silent. The ‘chat show’ entitled ‘Blachman’ is possibly the most se …

Samantha Ritchie

by Samantha Ritchie 

Objectifying women is now prime time entertainment in Denmark. A new TV show objectifies women by allowing two men to critique their bodies while the woman remains silent. The ‘chat show’ entitled ‘Blachman’ is possibly the most sexist show in television history.

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Who is the brains behind this TV show you may ask? Thomas Blachman – a Danish X Factor judge who is named the ‘Simon Cowell’ of Denmark. But, the best of it is that a woman commissioned this TV show and gave it the go ahead. Sofia Fromberg, the shows producer, states that “The first time I got the idea from Blachman on email I thought, ‘you can’t do that’. I then looked into it more and the programme’s proposed intentions.”

According to Fromberg, “Blachman wanted to look into why men were saying beautiful things about women’s bodies – but not to women themselves. He wanted to discover if there was place in between puritanical style discussions and pornography to discuss women’s bodies decently. I see how women are portrayed in the media – perfectly slim and with silicon breasts. And I agreed with Blachman that it was an issue worth debating.”

Blachman is right to a point where he was women in the media are portrayed as slim, young and cosmetically enhanced. However, does that mean creating a TV show which fundamentally demeans and objectifties somehow liberates women and makes them feel better about themselves? According to Blachman and Fromberg apparently so.

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The media notoriously has portrayed women as young, slim and pretty. At a recent conference, Miriam O’Reilly who won a landmark case against the BBC was unfairly dismissed for being ‘too old’ to be on Countryfile, discussed her experience as an older woman in the world of the media. One day she recalled being on set interviewing someone for Countryfile when the camera man and the producer stopped filming and went away to have a private discussion. When they returned they took Miriam aside, only to her horror, to be told that her grey roots were showing and if she didn’t mind putting on some of this black hairspray to cover them up. And the sad thing is, I’m sure that the BBC is not the first to make an older women feel like she is inadequate and they won’t be the last.

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In a recent survey it was highlighted that people tend to view women as older when they reach 30. Women also stated that “opportunities are not always presented to ‘older women’. Once you hit a certain age it’s assumed you have no drive or ambition left.” The perceptions of older women in society is disgraceful. The older a man gets he seems to gain knowledge, experience and looked upon as a mentor whereas the older a women gets she is less capable, attractive and incompetent. This is not the case. Both sexes gain knowledge and experience – there should not be inequalities here.

The way in which women are portrayed in the media reflects societal views. From being objectified from a young age to being cast aside as older after the age of 30. Attitudes and values must change and the media must include older women as TV presenters at peek times. 


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Samantha Ritchie